Ethnic group Kurds' ambitions caught in power games - The Syrian Kurds

The Syrian Kurds

They always anticipated U.S. support would run out, but President Donald Trump's abrupt decision to rapidly pull U.S. forces out of northeast Syria has nevertheless stunned the Kurds there, who for the past three years have been America's partner in fighting the Islamic State group.A withdrawal will leave Syrian Kurds exposed to Turkish threats of an invasion from one side and Syrian government troops on the other.
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The abandoned group

The abandoned group

The Kurds in the Middle East have been abandoned before by the United States and other international allies on whose support they'd pinned their aspirations.Over the past century, Kurds have gotten close to setting up their own state or autonomous regions on several occasions, only to have their dreams shattered after being abandoned by world powers. An old Kurdish proverb reflects a history of disappointments: ``We have no friends but the mountains.'
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Who are the Kurds?

Who are the Kurds?

The Kurds are an ethnic group numbering some 20 million people spread across four nations 10 million in Turkey, 6 million in Iran, 3.5 million in Iraq, and a little over 2 million in Syria. They speak an Indo-European language, related to Iran's Farsi, and are overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim.
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History of struggle and betrayals

History of struggle and betrayals

With the Ottoman Empire's collapse after World War I, the Kurds were promised an independent homeland in the 1920 Treaty of Sevres. But the treaty was never ratified, and ``Kurdistan'' was carved up. A Kurdish state was briefly established with support from the Soviet Union in Mahabad, northern Iran, in January 1947, but it collapsed 11 months later.Since then, there have been almost continuous Kurdish rebellions in Iran, Iraq and Turkey.
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The fight

The fight

In 1972, the U.S. helped arm the Iraqi Kurdish insurrection against Baghdad. It did so on behalf of Iran, then led by America's ally, Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who was hoping to pressure the Iraqi government in an ongoing border dispute. Three years later, the shah signed a border agreement with Baghdad and shut off the weapons pipeline. Then-Kurdish leader Mustafa Barzani wrote an impassioned letter to U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger pleading for support, but the American help ended. The Iraqi government crushed the Kurdish rebellion.

Source: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/ethnic-group-kurds-ambitions-caught-in-power-games/the-syrian-kurds/slideshow/67454669.cms

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