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ISIS-LINKED CYBER GROUP RELEASES ’KILL LIST’ OF 8,786 US TARGETS FOR LONE WOLF ATTACKS

A group of hackers supporting the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) have released a list of thousands of individuals in the U.S. and their addresses, calling for lone wolf attacks on the targets.
The list, which includes 8,786 names, was released by the pro-ISIS hacking group the United Cyber Caliphate (UCC) and verified by the terror monitor SITE. The six-minute-long video, which includes a threat against President Donald Trump, instructed would-be attackers to: “Kill them wherever you find them.”
The phrase is regularly used by ISIS  and its supporters on social media channels when trying to incite lone killers to carry out attacks on their own initiative.
header-wmreThe list, which includes 8,786 names was released by the pro-Islamic State hacking group the United Cyber Caliphate (UCC) and verified by the terror monitor SITE. SITE On 16 March UCC released a video saying its leader Osed Agha had been killed in a U.S. airstrike. The footage promised retaliation for the killing. The group “vowed to continue its work” and included scenes of an American flag on fire.
In July 2016 the hacking group released another list of targets calling for lone wolf attacks. SITE said the list included 1,700 individuals including members of Christian churches and Jewish synagogues in the United States.

The FBI has said in the past that making contact with those included on such lists was a routine procedure “in order to sensitize potential victims to the observed threat.”
The inclusion of churchgoers and members of synagogues is not surprising given the radical Islamist group’s treatment of anyone who doesn’t subscribe to their radical interpretation of Islam. 

Source: http://www.newsweek.com/isis-linked-cyber-group-releases-kill-list-8786-us-targets-lone-wolf-attacks-578765

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